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Skokie's Attempted Nazi March Archive

   
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  1. Board Meeting, June 12, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Reverend Thomas O'Connor.
    Reverend Thomas O'Connor speaks of the constitutional right of the freedom to worship. This right would be interfered with if there is a National Socialist Party of America (Nazi) demonstration in the Village on a Sunday. See other comments by Father William Galaty and Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz from this meeting. The Trustees respond in the next clip.

  2. Board Meeting, June 12, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Trustee Frank G. McCabe, David Schecter, President Albert J. Smith, and Trustee Morris Topol.
    Trustee Frank McCabe, David Schecter, President Albert J. Smith, and Trustee Morris Topol respond to the Niles Township Clergy Forum's concerns expressed by Father William Galaty and Reverend Thomas O'Connor. Please note: Trustee Morris Topol speaks towards the end of this clip and his speech comes through at a low volume, probably due to microphone placement.

  3. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Charles Levy (part three of three).
    Continuing from part one of the June 19, 1978 Board Meeting, Charles Levy offers Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz a copy of the Louis Black lawsuit against the Village. Schwartz explains that he cannot respond to the lawsuit until he is served with a notice of motion. Levy insists that he is trying to expedite the situation.

  4. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Charles Levy, Harvey Schwartz (part one of three).
    Charles Levy, former resident of Skokie and an attorney, informs the Board of Trustees that a lawsuit has been filed by Louis Black against the Village of Skokie. The suit charges that the neo-Nazi group that has been issued a permit to demonstrate in Skokie illegally because the National Socialist Party of America has not registered their organization with the state of Illinois. The exchange between Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz and Charles Levy continues in part two of the June 19, 1978 Board Meeting.

  5. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz speaks about crowd control perimeters (part two of four).
    In response to David Rosensweig's question Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz describes perimeters set for the neo-Nazi demonstration planned for July 26th and says that because he doesn't know how many people will be coming to the counter-demonstration, it is difficult to determine how large the crowd will be. He also says that he thinks that everyone should attend a counter-demonstration because that will be covered by the press.David Rosensweig asks for further clarification and Schwartz responds in part three of the June 19, 1978 Board Meeting.

  6. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz, David Rosensweig (part three of four).
    In response to David Rosensweig's question Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz further clarifies crowd control perimeters set for an upcoming neo-Nazi rally in Skokie. David Rosensweig states that he has just as much right to be on the Village Hall steps as the Nazis and Schwartz replies, "As disagreeable as it is for you to hear it, you will not be allowed to stand on the steps of Village Hall. You will have to stand outside the perimeter that is established...for the protection of life, property..."

  7. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: David Rosensweig (part one of four).
    David Rosensweig asks if what he understands from Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz's previous comments are correct: that there will be "an encircled area and there will be no passage for Skokie residents to go into that encircled area." Schwartz replies in part two of the June 19, 1978 Board Meeting.

  8. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: David Rosensweig, President Albert J. Smith, and an unidentified male speaker (part four of four).
    Following a statement from Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz regarding crowd control perimeters for an upcoming neo-Nazi rally in front of Skokie Village Hall, David Rosensweig objects to the fact that counter-demonstrators will not be allowed on the steps of Village Hall. President Albert J. Smith counters that it is the duty of the Skokie officials to uphold the law and that if people are coming to the counter-demonstration, "looking for a riot, then Sol Goldstein and Al Smith have failed." Smith goes on to say that a riot is what the neo-Nazis want and that "the whole country has us on trial" and that the Village's response to the demonstration will be closely watched. He speaks further at some length. An unidentified man speaks briefly, at the end and Sol Goldstein continues in the next clip. Please note: Some of the latter portion of Smith's speech is difficult to discern due to sound problems in the original 1978 recording and this clip is more than 7 minutes long.

  9. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Fay Waldman, Harvey Schwartz.
    Fay Waldman, a resident of Lincolnwood, IL, stresses that she will want freedom of movement after the counterdemonstration. Village Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz states that there will be restrictions regarding vehicles, but not for pedestrians.

  10. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Harvey Schwartz, Charles Levy (part two of three).
    Harvey Schwartz, Corporation Counsel for the Village of Skokie, states that "the order by Judge Bernard Decker, finding invalid certain provisions of our permit ordinance, was an injunction against all of the elected officials of this Village and myself and the Village Manager from interfering with the right, as determined by the court... for Collin, individually or as a member of his political party, as he calls it, to demonstrate in the Village of Skokie, quite apart from the element of permit." So that even if the permit is revoked, the order of the Federal Judge prevents the Village officials from permitting Collin to demonstrate. Charles Levy, former resident of Skokie and an attorney, asks if Frank Collin may come to Skokie and do "anything he wants" and Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz responds that Collin may "assemble here as he testified" in the federal court. Levy asks how broad the order is and Schwartz responds, "It's simply an injunction of the United States District Court against all of the elected officials... from interfering with the right of Frank Collin to demonstrate in the Village of Skokie, which was affirmed by the Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, and on which this Village then went further to United State Supreme Court" that decided to uphold the injunction.

  11. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Jacob Berg, Harvey Schwartz (part one of three).
    Jacob Berg, Corporate Secretary of the Jewish Defense League (JDL) of Illinois asks Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz about U.S. District Court Judge Bernard Decker's recent injunction preventing Village officials from preventing a neo-Nazi demonstration in Skokie.

    Berg says, "a year ago Judge Leighton invalidated the Chicago Park District's bond law requiring the bond of $300,000," and he asks if the language of that injunction was similar to that of Decker's. Berg goes on to say that Chicago officials used "every legal device" to prevent the neo-Nazis from demonstrating in Chicago and suggests that Skokie officials have not done enough to prevent the group from coming to Skokie. Schwartz responds that, in his opinion, the Skokie officials have done everything they can. Berg continues to argue.

    As the interaction between the two men escalates, Schwartz asks why the JDL did not file a lawsuit or add its name to a lawsuit to assist Skokie or Chicago in their legal battles. Berg continues to assert his opinion that Skokie Village officials have "quit" trying to prevent the neo-Nazi demonstration.

    This altercation is continued in the next clip.

  12. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: President Albert J. Smith (part three of three).
    President Albert J. Smith gives an impassioned speech in defense of the Village's legal actions in the lawsuits aimed at preventing the neo-Nazi group led by Frank Collin from demonstrating in Skokie. Smith is speaking largely in response to an angry exchange between Jacob Berg, of the Jewish Defense League (JDL) and Trustee Morris Topol.

    Please note: Much of this speech is difficult to hear due to sound problems in the original recording.

  13. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Sol Goldstein.
    Following a lengthy speech given by President Albert J. Smith, Sol Goldstein says that he is sure that Smith "will not disappoint us, will not disappoint humanity" and reminds the group that the "whole world is looking at us" and that "Skokie is a symbol of the world" and encourages everyone to stick together.

  14. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Trustee Morris Topol, Jacob Berg, and Trustee Charles Conrad (part two of three).
    Trustee Morris Topol angrily responds to Jacob Berg's comments.

  15. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Unidentified female speaker, President Albert J. Smith, and Unidentified male speaker.
    An unidentified female speaker asks President Albert J. Smith to give assurance that there will be "all due protection and order during this demonstration." President Smith responds in the affirmative. An unidentified male speaker, a member of the Janusz Korshak League, thanks the mayor and Harvey Schwartz for the work that they have done. He doesn't think that the demonstration should be delayed any further and that it should just be gotten over with.

  16. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Unidentified male speaker
    An unidentified male speaker stating that he is proud of President Albert J. Smith and he believes that Smith will be remembered as "one of the great human beings." He goes on to say that you cannot always control events and that there are people who, though they are law-abiding, non-violent people, will sit down at the Village Hall and let happen what will happen. An unidentified male speaker suggests that if the Nazis are to stand on the steps of the Village Hall, that members of Village government, and survivors of the Holocaust are also allowed to stand on the steps alongside them.

  17. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Unidentified speaker, Harvey Schwartz.
    An unidentified male speaker, possibly Eddie Yosser, asks for clarifications regarding a rumor that there will be a curfew in the Village. Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz states that "the only activities that are going on now relate to the possibility... that the demonstration will take place on Sunday, the 25th... there will be notice from the Village to residents in this area advising them of certain of those plans during this week." The speaker asks if counter-demonstrators will be able to be present as spectators at the Village Hall, "along with the Nazis." Schwartz tells the group that the counter-demonstrators will be asked to remain within the perimeters designated by the authorities. The group becomes concerned that they will not have free movement.

  18. Board Meeting, June 19, 1978, Citizens' Comments: William Fried, President Albert J. Smith.
    William Fried asks if it is "necessary to use the taxpayers money to offer [the Nazis] free police protection" when the hold a rally in Skokie. President Albert J. Smith responds that it is the law to offer this protection. Fried then says, "Maybe after the parade, we should offer them a free steak dinner and thank them for what they're doing." Smith replies, "That's not the law," which is followed by applause and laughter.

  19. Board Meeting, June 20, 1977, Citizens Comments: Luda Beck
    Luda Beck speaks during the Citizens Comments portion of the meeting: "To many of us [the Holocaust] isn't just statistics. 'Cause many of us have lost our loved ones and when we look through our albums and we see some of the young people that were cut down by the Nazis, we don't want them here; we don't want it repeated." She insists that the Village government do what they can to prevent the Nazis from coming to Skokie.

  20. Board Meeting, June 20, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Ed Fleischman.
    Ed Fleischman, former Village Trustee, speaks during the Citizens Comments portion of the meeting. He was formerly the state commander of the Jewish War Veterans and he and his group violently confronted George Rockwell in front of the Stevens Hotel.

    He states that, "In the event that our legal processes do not keep them out... we must recognize that the objective of these people in coming here is to get publicity." He subscribes to the policy of giving the Nazis the "silent treatment," which will demonstrate their impotence.

  21. Board Meeting, June 20, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Jack Israel.
    Jack Israel, a boy, gives a speech opposed to the Nazis marching in Skokie. He tells the Village officials to not let the Nazis march in Skokie under any circumstances and that, "the amendment says freedom of speech, not freedom to spread hatred against minorities."

  22. Board Meeting, June 20, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Nathan Schaffner.
    Nathan Schaffner refers to a national Nazi convention that is planned in Chicago. Schaffner says that the National Socialist Party (Nazis) persist in their efforts to come to Skokie to "show their might." He also refers to Jack Israel's previous speech. He asserts that Skokie has over 7,000 refugees from the Holocaust and that Collin's July 4th demonstration must be prevented.

  23. Board Meeting, June 20, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Ruth Schaffner.
    Ruth Schaffner, a 21-year resident of Skokie, congratulates the Village government for their actions related to the attempted Nazi march and speaks out against prejudice. She states that allowing the Nazis to come to Skokie on July 4th, "is not a matter of free speech, it is a matter of permitting a party to march in Nazi uniforms with swastikas and distributing hate literature and undermining our very existence." She asks that the Village government prevent the July 4th march by the neo-Nazis.

  24. Board Meeting, June 20, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Trustee Morris Topol responds to Ed Fleischman's comments.
    Trustee Morris Topol responds to Ed Fleischman's remarks and expresses confidence that the three ordinances will prevent the march from occurring. He expresses thanks and admiration to Harvey Schwartz and his assistants.

  25. Board Meeting, June 20, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Unidentified male speaker regarding Jack Mabley column in the Chicago Tribune.
    President Albert J. Smith responds to an unidentified male speaker regarding asking members of the press to limit their coverage of the forthcoming neo-Nazi rally in Skokie by saying that reporters feel that they are obliged to report the news and thus cannot be prevented from covering the event. An unidentified Trustee mentions Jack Mabley's column in the Chicago Tribune which also states that the media shouldn't publicize the march. The initial speaker replies, reinforcing his previous position. Smith says that Village officials will continue to seek cooperation from members of the press.

  26. Board Meeting, June 20, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Unidentified male speaker.
    An unidentified male speaker responds to Trustee Morris Topol's comments. He asks if the group knows that Meier Kahane, of the Jewish Defense League is planning to come to Skokie to demonstrate against the neo-Nazis who plan to hold a rally in Skokie and states that there is little that the Village officials can do to stop people from coming to Skokie to counter-demonstrate. He also asks if Village officials have approached the media to see if they can help.

    President Albert J. Smith responds briefly, and continues in the next clip.

    Please note: The sound in the original 1977 original recording is distorted (probably due to the recording microphone).

  27. Board Meeting, June 26, 1978, Unfinished business: President Albert J. Smith, Sam Dubin, Unfinished business: Trustee Jacqueline Gorell.
    President Albert J. Smith thanks the Board of Trustees for their support. Sam Dubin, President of the Home Owners' Council also thanks the Village. Village Trustee Jacqueline Gorell proposes the Village of Skokie send a letter in support to the southwest side community in Chicago now facing a Nazi demonstration. Motion is carried to send letters in the Chicago Park District and the City of Chicago in support of their efforts. Please note: The sound quality is poor in this recording.

  28. Board Meeting, June 26, 1978, Unfinished business: President Albert J. Smith.
    President Albert J. Smith describes letters he has gotten from supporters nationwide. Motion is carried to express the thanks of the people of Skokie to the Ministerial Fellowship of the Palm Beaches in appreciation for the support they have given to the Village. Please note: The sound quality is poor in this recording.

  29. Board Meeting, June 26, 1978, Unfinished business: President Albert J. Smith.
    President Albert J. Smith presents an advertisement from the Waterloo-Kitchener, Ontario, Canada Skokie Support Committee, in support of Skokie. Motion is carried to express thanks to this group. Please note: The sound quality is poor in this recording.

  30. Board Meeting, June 26, 1978, Unfinished business: President Albert J. Smith.
    President Albert J. Smith presents a 3/4-page advertisement that says, "We Stand with the People of Skokie," sponsored by B'nai B'rith Lodge in Springfield, Illinois, the Central Illinois Jewish Federation, Rockford Jewish Community Relations Council, the Springfield Jewish Community Relations Council, and the Springfield Jewish Federation. in support of Skokie. Motion is carried to express thanks to this group. Please note: The sound quality is poor in this recording.

  31. Board Meeting, June 26, 1978, Unfinished business: President Albert J. Smith.
    President Albert J. Smith presents advertisements from the Christian Friends of Israel of Clear Lake, Iowa and the Christian Israel Friendship League of Paradise, California. Smith comments on the amount of support sent to the Jewish Community of Skokie from Christian groups. He jokes that all of these groups should pray for rain on the scheduled day of the demonstration. Please note: The sound quality is poor in this recording.

  32. Board Meeting, June 27, 1977, Citizens' Comments Jack Deino.
    Jack Deino, a boy, responds to Morris Topol's request that members of the community not come to the Village Hall on July 4th. He reads a speech that strongly opposes the Supreme Court decision allowing the neo-Nazi group to come to Skokie. He says that on the Fourth of July, "we should not let them come and make believers [of their hate speech] of us, we should all forget about our holiday plans and stop them from making believers of us, we should all block the streets off with our cars and push them back and make believers of them..."

  33. Board Meeting, June 27, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Abraham Beck.
    Abraham Beck thanks the Mayor and the Village Trustees. He asserts that the Nazis are not only a threat to the Jews, but to every American, "every one who believes in the Bill of Rights, every one who believes that we have a right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness."

  34. Board Meeting, June 27, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Albert Baker, Trustee Morris Topol.
    Albert Baker takes issue with the statement that "the good people of Skokie may provoke a problem." He says, "If there's [sic] no Nazis, the good people of Skokie will not provoke a problem. If the Nazis do in fact march or gain access to this area then the good people of Skokie may in fact create a problem..." Trustee Morris Topol responds, by reasserting that it would be best for all concerned that citizens "[proceed] about their regular business" on July 4th instead of coming out for a counterdemonstration on that day.

  35. Board Meeting, June 27, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Jack Israel.
    Jack Israel asserts that all of the people of Skokie should go out to demonstrate against the Nazis.

  36. Board Meeting, June 27, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Philip Jacks, President Albert J. Smith, and Trustee Morris Topol.
    Philip Jacks asks why the march will not happen on July 4th. President Albert J. Smith states that he cannot give details, but expresses his confidence that the neo-Nazi march will not occur. Trustee Morris Topol asks the people of Skokie to heed Smith's words and reasserts his request that members of the community do not come to Village Hall on July 4th. Jacks asks about plans for further demonstrations.

  37. Board Meeting, June 27, 1977, Citizens' Comments: President Albert Smith announces that the neo-Nazis will not march in Skokie on July 4, 1977, Trustee Morris Topol speaks.
    President Albert J. Smith announces that, "based on all the information that we have on hand at this particular time, we are convinced that the Nazis will not march in Skokie on July 4th." Citizens Comments follow. Trustee Morris Topol recommends that citizens of Skokie go about their normal July 4th celebrations instead of congregating at Skokie Village Hall.

  38. Board Meeting, June 27, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Ruth Schaffner, Jack Israel.
    Ruth Schaffner wants "a strong confirmation [from the Trustees] there will not be a single Nazi in our vicinity on July 4th." Jack Israel (in the background) re-states that he does not want the Nazis to come to Skokie.

  39. Board Meeting, June 27, 1977, Citizens' Comments: Unidentified male speaker.
    An unidentified male speaker, possibly David Rosensweig, agrees with Trustee Morris Topol's request that people do not come to the Village Hall on July 4th, but expresses concern that people will disregard the request.

  40. Board Meeting, June 5, 1978, Report of the Corporation Counsel: Harvey Schwartz.
    Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz reports on National Socialist Party vs. Village of Skokie. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals denies a stay of Circuit Court ruling to delay a demonstration by the National Socialist Party of America (neo-Nazis) in Skokie on June 25, 1978. An appeal will be filed with the United States Supreme Court.

  41. Board Meeting, May 2, 1977, Jack Weinman.
    Jack Weinman, Chairman of the 10th Congressional District Politics for the People, reads a statement and two resolutions for the Skokie Village Board of Trustees to consider to send to the United States Congress to support opposition to anti-Semitism, racism and genocide. He commends peaceful rallies held the previous day (Saturday). The motion to carry the resolution is later approved unanimously (though the vote is not in this audio clip). Please note: Some audio quality is poor as the microphone is jostled during the reading of the resolutions towards the end of the sound clip.

  42. Board Meeting, May 2, 1977, Report of the Corporation Counsel: Harvey Schwartz reads "An Ordinance Prohibiting Demonstrations by Members of Political parties Wearing Military-Style Uniforms."
    Harvey Schwartz, during his Report of the Corporation Counsel, introduces and reads the second of three ordinances entitled, "An Ordinance Prohibiting Demonstrations by Members of Political Parties Wearing Military-Style Uniforms." Schwartz reads the ordinance quickly. The motion to adopt the ordinance is passed by a unanimous vote (not on this sound clip).

  43. Board Meeting, May 2, 1977, Report of the Corporation Counsel: Harvey Schwartz reads "An Ordinance Prohibiting the Dissemination of Materials Which Promote and Incite Group Hatred."
    Harvey Schwartz, during his Report of the Corporation Counsel, introduces and reads the third of three ordinances entitled, "An Ordinance Prohibiting the Dissemination of Materials Which Promote and Incite Group Hatred." Schwartz reads the ordinance quickly. The motion to adopt the ordinances is passed by a unanimous vote (not on this sound clip).

  44. Board Meeting, May 2, 1977, Report of the Corporation Counsel: Harvey Schwartz reads "An Ordinance Relating to Parades and Public Assemblies."
    Harvey Schwartz, during his Report of the Corporation Counsel introduces and reads the first of three ordinances, entitled, "An Ordinance Relating to Parades and Public Assemblies." This ordinance is similar to rules enacted by the Skokie Park District and the Chicago Park District and it outlines the requirements of applying for a permit to hold a parade or public assembly in Skokie. Schwartz asks that the Board set aside the regular order of business in order to attend to this and the other two ordinances. That request (not included in this sound clip) is approved unanimously as is the motion to adopt the ordinance.

  45. Board Meeting, May 22, 1978, Report of the Corporation Counsel: Harvey Schwartz.
    Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz announces the decision from the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals on the National Socialist Party vs. Village of Skokie. The court reversed a lower court's decision to block the march.

  46. Board Meeting, May 30, 1978, Citizens' Comments: Harold Zissman.
    Harold Zissman asks what organizations have requested a permit to demonstrate on the same day that the National Socialist Party of America (Nazis) is scheduled to hold a rally. Zissman would like to obtain a permit for a counterdemonstration. Please note: The sound quality in this clip is poor.

  47. Board Meeting, October 17, 1977, Report of the Corporation Counsel: Harvey Schwartz.
    Corporation Counsel Harvey Schwartz reports on the pending case in the District Court, Collin vs. Skokie, which challenges the Village's ordinances. Judge Bernard Decker is scheduled to rule on the case on Friday, October 21, 1978. There is no news from the Illinois Supreme Court on that case.

  48. Boy begs: Stop Nazis
    Community reaction following lifting of injunction preventing the National Socialist Party of America (Nazis) from marching in Skokie.

  49. Briefly Speaking, April 2, 1978
    Statement entitled, "Briefly Speaking," from the Niles Township Jewish Congregation newsletter dated April 2, 1978 (24 Adar 11 5738).

  50. CBS recaps a slice of life in 'Skokie'
    Mixed review of made-for-television movie "Skokie." Includes photograph of Danny Kaye and photograph of Eli Wallach and John Rubenstein.

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