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Park Forest -- An Illinois Planned Community

   
  Records 1 to 51 of 76   | Next records -->

  1. American Community Builders Administration Building
    ACB's administration building in the Park Forest shopping center.

  2. American Community Builders Administration Building and mother with baby in carriage
    ACB's Administration building in the Park Forest shopping center.

  3. American Community Builders Board of Directors and Personnel
    From left to right, sitting: Allan S. Harrison, chief of construction; Nathan Manilow, treasurer; Philip M. KLutznick, president; Jerrold Loebl, vice-president and architect; Carroll Sweet, Sr., member of the board of directors. Standing are: Carroll Sweet, Jr., special assistant to the president; Israel Rafkind, comptroller; Hart Perry, secretary; Richard M. Bennett, staff architect; Norman S. Schlossman, staff architect; Charles Waldmann, member of the board and utility engineer [called chief engineer, as well]; Joseph Goldman, construction adviser; Elbert Peets, town planner; and Nathan E. Jacobs, public relations counselor.

  4. American Community Builders Directors
    Jerrold Loebl, architect, Charles Waldmann, chief engineer, Philip M. Klutznick, president, and Nathan Manilow, treasurer in a publicity shot from October 1946, the time of the groundbreaking for Park Forest.

  5. American Community Builders Logo
    This image is of two children in front of the Clock Tower which stood in the center of the Park Forest Plaza. The Park Forest Plaza was one of the first two shopping centers in the world. This image was used for many years as the logo of American Community Builders and its subsidiaries.

  6. American Community Builders officers
    A portrait found in the promotional piece, "Where Thistles Grew Before." From left to right are Charles Waldmann, Jerrold Loebl, Philip Klutznick, Nathan Manilow, Carroll Sweet, Sr., and Hart Perry.

  7. Anthony Scariano, Sr.
    Anthony "Tony" Scariano, Sr. was a resident of Park Forest by October 1948. He was the lawyer who represented the people who sold to the first African-American family to move in to Park Forest in 1959. He spent a term as a State Representative. He was involved in the early schools, and as a lawyer, specialized in school law, represent in several local school districts.
    In his transcript, he discusses his reasons for coming to Park Forest, shopping and the Park Forest Plaza, early village board meetings, Committee for Municipal Incorporation, the character of early villagers, housing, local Democratic party politics, his political and legal involvements, Park Forest schools, changes in the village, advantages of living in Park Forest, and integration.

  8. Aqua Center
    The wading pools and the sunbathing decks at the Aqua Center.

  9. Aqua Center
    A lifeguard watching over the diving area at the Aqua Center. The photo shows the fence dividing the octagon pool and the toddler pool.

  10. Aqua Center
    The Aqua Center was a swimming pool complex built by the citizens of Park Forest and opened ca.1954.

  11. Aqua Center
    A photograph of the octagon pool looking south.

  12. Aqua Center aerial
    The Aqua Center was a swimming pool complex built by the citizens of Park Forest and opened ca.1954.

  13. Aqua Center Board Members[?]
    From left to right:Carroll F. Sweet, Jr., ? who was the first Chairman of the Aqua Center, Beverly Byrne, and another unidentified man who may be Kris Martin.

  14. Aqua Center construction
    This photograph shows the Aqua Center under construction.

  15. Area Became a Microcosm of America Itself
    Richard Sherman, then a professor of history at Prairie State College in Chicago Heights, Illinois, wrote 9-10 articles on South Suburban History for the Star Newspapers in 1988. In this article he relates the changes in the South Suburban region to demographic changes around the country. The article is full of statistics on population growth and on racial and average age changes in the region. Published by Star Newspapers: Chicago Heights, IL.

  16. Bernard G. Cunningham
    Bernard G. Cunningham moved to Park Forest with his wife Florence in 1951. He quickly became involved in Park Forest politics. He served as Village President from April 1961 to April 1971.
    In Part 1 of his oral history he explains why he came to Park Forest, describes the village in 1951, early improvised schools, St. Irenaeus School, the relationship betwen the public and American Community Builders, IC Parking, and his involvement with the Recreation and Parks Commission, which marked his first involvement with the village government.
    In Part 2 he discusses his first term as village trustee, Park Forest Plaza, schools, utilities, IC parking, American Community Builders, street design, annexation of the Lincolnwood subdivision, parks and recreation, library referendum, and social problems.
    In Part 3 he discusses the Park Forest Plaza, taxes and integration.
    In Part 4 he discusses Park Forest Plaza, integration, Industry Park, the Greenbelt Program, and transportation in the south suburbs.
    In Part 5 he discusses transportation in the south suburbs, trust agreements with American Community Builders, street design, subdivision regulations, the effect of the developer leaving the village, the development of the Park Forest Plaza by Nathan Manilow and Jack Rashkin, formation of the housing cooperatives, Park Forest South, Governors State University, expansion of the village, and the All-America City awards.
    In Part 6 he offers a retrospective on the village and speculates on the history of the village as he saw it in 1980.

  17. Bill Simpson
    Bill Simpson was one of the founders of the local chapter of the NAACP. He moved to Park Forest with his family in December 1963 to make a civil rights statement. In his transcript he describes how his family was received, how his daughter fared in the schools when she was in the minority and his views on integration maintenance. He also discusses a group he was part of named Fellowship for Action.

  18. Blaine (Bud) Osterling
    Blaine "Bud" Osterling explains the community planning and development of Park Forest. Also talks about various buildings such as schools, townhouses, and single-family housing.

  19. Building the townhouses
    The history of Park Forest, Illinois a post-World War II planned suburb built by American Community Builders which began in 1946. Project chart for American Community Builders, village of Park Forest. Loebl, Schlossman and Bennett, architects.

  20. Carroll F. Sweet, Jr.
    Carroll F. Sweet, Jr. was the son of the man who had the idea for the G. I. town, for returning veterans after World War II. Carroll F. Sweet, Sr. brought together Nathan Manilow and Philip Klutznick to build Park Forest, Illinois. Carroll F. SWeet, Jr. was hired in 1946 as an assistant to Philip Klutznick. He was on the staff of American Community Builders for the first ten years of the village and was a seminal character in the development of the village.

  21. Carroll F. Sweet, Sr., and Carroll F. Sweet, Jr.
    A photograph of the two taken in Carroll, Jr.'s home at 350 Oakwood. This shot is an interior shot. It was taken by Bernard Klein.

  22. Carroll F. Sweet, Sr., and Carroll F. Sweet, Jr.
    A photograph of the two taken outside Carroll, Jr.'s home at 350 Oakwood. Carroll, Sr., is seated in the driver seat of a car, and Carroll ,Jr., is beside the car. It was taken by Bernard Klein.

  23. Dr. Gerson Englemann
    Dr. Gerson Engelmann was the first pastor of Faith United Protestant Church, the first church in the United Protestant churches in Park Forest. He discusses the United Protestant movement, counseling the new residents, William Whyte's "The Organization Man," life in the courts, the population growth, interfaith co-operation in the village and the success of the village.

  24. Edward Waterman
    Edward Waterman and his wife moved to Park Forest in November 1948. Mr. Waterman was involved in the development of Park Forest and was a member of the first school board in District 163. In this interview he speaks of managing the rental properties, the difficulties and problems involved in getting the construction of propertie completed, discrimination against minorities, and integration.

  25. Elaine Garretson
    Elaine Garretson came to Park Forest in November 1949 with her husband, James, and 4 small children. They later had a fifth child. When she did this interview in 1980, they still lived in the townhouse they rented in the beginning.
    In her oral history transcript, she describes their reasons for coming to Park Forest, the condition of the rental at time of move-in, medical services, the polio epidemic, adult parties in the tot yards, shopping before and after the Park Forest Plaza was built, Forest Boulevard School and the first library in it, Elizabeth Waldmann's nursery school, the beginning of the Unitarian Church, Park Forest Playhouse, the first Beaux Arts Ball, Children's Community Theatre, teaching piano in her home, bringing the Picture Lady program to Park Forest, and the Distinguished Citizen of the Month program.

  26. Entry of Minorities a Big Recent Development
    Newspaper article.

  27. Every day is moving day in Park Forest
    A series of full-page newspaper ads with photographs inset, a map to Park Forest, and text highlighting some aspect of life in Park Forest.

  28. Facts about our PTA activities
    A series of full-page newspaper ads with photographs inset, a map to Park Forest, and text highlighting some aspect of life in Park Forest.

  29. Family building brick barbecue
    Family of four building brick barbeque off of patio behind a Park forest ranch home.

  30. Florence McCoy Schumacher
    Florence McCoy Schumacher talks about her great-grandparents John and Sabra McCoy, two of the earliest settlers in the Park Forest area, who arrived in 1834. She indicates the location of their cabin and farm buildings, and of the Pottawatomie Indian campground for which there is a marker on the south side of Sauk Trail, located about a quarter of a mile west of Park Forest. She describes the Pottawatomie's migratory pattern, use of burial grounds, and how they used the McCoy property. She mentions the slough in Park Forest, Indian Wood Country Club, and what the Crete residents thought of Park Forest when is was being built.
    Her father, Milton H. McCoy, was a civil engineer for Chicago Heights, Illinois. Mrs. Schumacher taught in a temorary house school for Talala School, served on the School District 201-U Board from 1966-1970, taught at Crete Community High School when it was just a two-year high school for twelve to thirteen years, then taught EMT at Bloom High School. She briefly discusses the Park Forest Plaza shopping center. She confirmes the story that John and Sabra's farm was a stop on the Underground Railroad.

  31. G.I. Town and the Organization Man
    Dr. Larry McClellan, a professor retired from Governors State University, now working for the Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission, writes the local history column, "Time Frame," which runs in the Star Newspapers once a month. In this column he discusses the history and reputation of Park Forest a fully-planned community. He briefly describes the two books on Park Forest, "America's Original GI Town: Park Forest, Illinois," by Gregory Randall and "The Organization Man," by William H. Whyte. Published by Star Newspapers: Chicago Heights, IL.

  32. Harold Brown
    History of Park Forest, Illinois, a post-World War II planned community.
    Harold Brown came to Park Forest in 1955. He became a community leader, serving on the school boards of District 163 and 227. Later than this oral history interview, he became a realtor and village trustee for several years. Mr. Brown gives a description of the village in 1955, describes buying his house in Westwood subdivision and of adding on to it over the years, including a small swimming pool. He discusses his community involvement and participation in the PTA, and the school boards. His involvement with the school boards overlapped with the time when Beacon Hill/Forest Heights was added to the school systems, and he was involved with the 227 board when that disctict was desegregated. He describes the Committee for Non-Partisan Government, housing, and zoning, character of early villagers and feelings about Park Forest.

  33. History Search Packet - Teaching Park Forest History
    The History Search Packet was produced by D. Stanley Moore, a former teacher at Rich East High School. He was one of the earliest teachers at the school, so lived many years in the village. The packet was created as part of a workshop that Dr. Moore and Jane Nicoll, local history librarian, gave for teachers in the area. It is intended to give teachers ideas and lesson plans for projects on Park Forest history. It will be most useful to teachers of middle school through high school. It may also be useful to college instructors. It is divided into seven sections: Introduction (includes an extensive bibliography of materials available at the Park Forest Public Library); The Community of Diversity (covers projects on integration and school desegregation as well as integration maintenance); The Creative Community (addresses the deep involvement Park Foresters have had in the many of the arts); The Community of Protest (addresses Park Forest's and the world's response to the Viet Nam conflict and changes in the political and social atmosphere in the 1960s and 1970s); Foundations of Community (talks about what is involved in planning a community and issues from Park Forest's past between developer, residents, and government); The Future of Community (addresses strategic planning and also leads students to books on predictions of the future and the subject "Futurism"). In each section Dr. Moore addresses the issues and suggests projects involving not only Park Forest but the issue as it related to the world at the time. Note: Part 6, The Community of Learning is not included in this document.

  34. Homes For Sale in Beautiful Park Forest
    American Community Builders' brochure describing Park Forest, a post World War II planned suburb, which began in 1946.

  35. Hours, earnings and wage rates, 1940-1946
    A chart included in the binder with "Where Thistles Grew Before."

  36. In Memoriam, Carroll F. Sweet, Sr.
    Bulletin from the memorial service for Carroll F. Sweet, Sr., October 13, 1955. In the bulletin, Carroll F. Sweet, Jr, has written a biography of his father (going into more detail than he does in his oral history or his separately published autobiography of his Park Forest years.)

  37. J. Ron McLeod
    J. Ron McLeod moved to Park Forest, Illinois in 1950. This interview was done in 2000, just before his 80th birthday. Ron and his first wife originally lived in two different townhouses, in the original rental area. Later, they bought a house on Kentucky Street, where Ron was still living at the time of the interview. Ron made considerable contributions to the life of the village.
    In 1951 Ron was one of the organizers of Boys Baseball which he also refers to as Little League Baseball. He describes the diamond in the middle of the Park Forest Plaza near the Clocktower. He discusses being a member of the Lions Club and the Lions Carnival. His second wife, Joanne is a leading member of Kiwanis, and he discusses their activities for that group including working for the annual Pancake Day. Ron spent several years serving on the Village Board of Trustees and discusses the early days of the board and what it was like to serve on it then as opposed to serving on it in the 70s and 80s, the current government of the village and the original philosophy of the structure of Park Forest's form of government.
    Ron has been a very active member in the life of Faith United Protestant Church. He covers their growth and current problems as well as focusing on Faith's first pastor, Gerson Engelmann. Having been a professional fundraiser for many years, Ron volunteered in many capacities as a fundraiser for the community. He discusses his work with the Community Chest which became United Way for which he served as Executive Director, Freedom Hall Committee, Gateway to Information Campaign for the library, Memory Lane Bricks and the 50th Anniversary Committee.
    Ron served as Director of Development for Valparaiso University, raising $52 million dollars in one campaign alone. He has raised more than $62 million in the 40 years he has been a fundraiser. He speaks about his service in the Royal Canadian Air Force in World War II, working for Trans Canada airlines at Malton Airport in Toronto, and working for Radio Free Europe in Chicago. He spends some time on early life in the courts, what it was like to have no car, how he commuted to the city. He discusses men he admired including Gerson Engelmann, Robert Dinerstein, Henry Dietch, Bernard Cunningham, John Scott, Bob Smart, and Harold Brown. Integration of the village and reactions to that, problems with the different phases of shopping center development, negotiations with American Community Builders, Park Forest's Home Rule and non-partisan politics in the village elections are all touched on.

  38. Jack Rashkin, ACB sales director, with a couple in front of a display board
    Jack Rashkin, ACB Sales Director, showing prospective tenants an advertising board display about Park Forest. The board's theme is, "Park Forest: A New Way of Life."

  39. James D. Saul
    James Saul came to Park Forest in 1953. In his oral history transcript he discusses the Social Action Committee of the Unitarian Church and their efforts to integrate Park Forest, performing in the play "In White America" (about the history of African-Americans in the United States) for the Committee, his involvement with the Environment Conservation Commission, and the relationship between the home buyers and American Community Builders.

  40. Jerrold Loebl and Charles Waldmann
    A portrait found in the promotional piece, "Where Thistles Grew Before".

  41. Judge Henry X. Dietch
    Henry Dietch came to the village in February, 1949 with his wife Shirley. He was in attendance at the tent meeting in November 1948. Judge Dietch served as the second village president from October 10, 1950 until April 26, 1955. He later served as the village attorney.
    In this oral history, he discusses his reasons for coming to Park Forest, characteristics of the early villagers, the relationship between the developers and the residents, the tent meeting of November 27, 1948, incorporation of the village, the relationship between ACB and the village government, American Community Builders and integration, the village government, community involvement and participation, nonpartisanship, Jewish residents, Park Forest South, the plan commission and zoning, Industry Park, publicity about the village, William H. Whyte's "The Organization Man," council-manager government, home rule, the Park Forest Plaza, Philip Klutznick, and children and values.

  42. Larry Clark
    Larry Clark was the first African-American to purchase and build a house in the village of Park Forest. His home was in the new Lincolnwood Subdivision, at 205 N. Orchard. The house was built in 1965. He grew up in East Chicago Heights, and chose to build in Park Forest after being badly treated and refused in other suburbs in the area.
    In his oral history transcript he discusses his reasons for coming to Park Forest, his dealings with the builders and with the salesman, Fred Peterman, his being the first African-American to be allowed to use in-town financing to purchase his home, the effect of the Human Relations Commission's visits to his neighbors, appearing on Channel 7 News, the Open Occupancy Act and its effect on the builders, and Dr. Charles Gavin and the Gavin Foundation. He was asked about the degree to which blacks in the community interacted, about discrimination in the community, about the effect on his chidren of growing up in an integrated community, and about the desegregation of the schools, which he speaks about briefly.

  43. Leona DeLue
    Leona DeLue, her husband Ross, and their five year-old daughter, Mary, were one of the first three families to move in to Park Forest in August 1948. Because the DeLues were the only one of the three families to remain in Park Forest, they were often regarded as Park Forest's first residents and certainly the longest in-residence, only moving to Florida in late 1999.
    In her transcript, she discusses American Community Builders, a description of the village when they first moved in, development of the schools in Park Forest, her involvement with the National Council of Jewish Women, William H. Whyte's "The Organization Man", and integration in Park Forest.

  44. Linus Carroll
    This is the oral history transcript of Mr. Linus Carroll who was one of the organizers of the Park Forest Conservatory in 1954. The conservatory provided lessons on musical instruments, and eventually dance classes for many years in Park Forest. Mr. Carroll discusses the conservatory's programs and growth, teachers and musicians who learned there, his own professional activities, and other principals in the development of the conservatory.

  45. Marshall Field's Groundbreaking, exterior shot
    A promotional shot of ACB and Field's officers actually breaking ground. Philip Klutznick and Nathan Manilow are in the center. Mr. Klutznick is actively spading dirt. The other gentleman are apparently Field people. The Clocktower is in the background.

  46. Marshall Field's Groundbreaking, exterior shot
    Philip Klutznick and Nathan Manilow after unveiling a brass plaque on the base of the clocktower, probably commemorating the date of the groundbreaking of Marshall Field's store. Sam Beber and another gentleman are on the other side of the plaque.

  47. Marshall Field's Groundbreaking, exterior shot
    Philip Klutznick and Nathan Manilow, with their backs to the camera, are unveiling a brass plaque on the base of the clocktower, probably commemorating the date of the groundbreaking of Marshall Field's store.

  48. Marshall Field's Groundbreaking, exterior shot
    A promotional shot of ACB and Field's officers actually breaking ground. Philip Klutznick and Nathan Manilow are the two actively spading dirt. The other gentleman are apparently Field people.

  49. Marshall Field's Groundbreaking, interior shot
    A promotional shot of ACB and Field's officers. Left to right: Sam Beber, unidentified, Philip Klutznick, a Field's person, Nathan Manilow, and another unidentified gentleman.

  50. Marshall Field's Groundbreaking, interior shot
    A promotional shot of ACB and Field's officers. Left to right: Sam Beber, unidentified,Philip Klutznick, a Field's person, Nathan Manilow, and another unidentified gentleman.

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