HOME |   Help |    All collections |  ...by Institution | Contact Us |  About This Collection |    Rights |    From

A service of the Illinois State Library and the Office of the Illinois Secretary of StateILLINOIS DIGITAL ARCHIVES

 

Arlington Heights Military History

   
  Records 1 to 15 of 15  

  1. Certificate of Exemption -- Christian Volz
    Exemption from serving on account of having furnished a substitute. Dimensions: 10.25 in x 8 in. This document is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org).

  2. Civil War Diaries of Charles Sigwalt - Diary 1 (January 6, 1862 - December 31, 1862)
    Charles Sigwalt, originally a resident of Long Grove, Illinois, went on to become a prominent businessman, Postmaster and eventually Village President [Mayor] of Arlington Heights, Illinois. He was Village President during the years 1891-1893, 1894-1897 and 1899-1905. This diary begins with Sigwalt's daily life on a farm in Long Grove and continues with his enlistment and involvement in the 88th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. This diary is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org).

  3. Civil War Diaries of Charles Sigwalt - Diary 2 (January 1, 1863 - January 21, 1864)
    Charles Sigwalt, originally a resident of Long Grove, Illinois, went on to become a prominent businessman, Postmaster and eventually Village President [Mayor] of Arlington Heights, Illinois. He was Village President during the years 1891-1893, 1894-1897 and 1899-1905. The diary presented here describes his life as a member of the 88th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the years 1863 and early 1864. Grammatical corrections have not been made in this transcription [occasionally brackets are used to clarify a notation]. Dimensions of diary page approximately 14 cm. x 8.3 cm. x 1.3 cm. (5.5" x 3.25" x 0.5") This diary is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org).

  4. Civil War Diaries of Charles Sigwalt - Diary 3 (January 1, 1864 - December 31, 1864)
    Charles Sigwalt, originally a resident of Long Grove, Illinois, went on to become a prominent businessman, Postmaster and eventually Village President (Mayor) of Arlington Heights, Illinois. He was Village President during the years 1891-1893, 1894-1897 and 1899-1905. The diary presented here describes his life as a member of the 88th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry during 1864. Grammatical corrections have not been made in this transcription [occasionally brackets are used to clarify a notation]. This diary is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society http://www.ahmuseum.org.

  5. Civil War Diaries of Charles Sigwalt - Diary 4 (January 1, 1865 - October 17, 1865)
    Charles Sigwalt, originally a resident of Long Grove, Illinois, went on to become a prominent businessman, Postmaster and eventually Village President [Mayor] of Arlington Heights, Illinois. He was Village President during the years 1891-1893, 1894-1897 and 1899-1905. The diary presented here describes his life as a member of the 88th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the year 1864. Grammatical corrections have not been made in this transcription [occasionally brackets are used to clarify a notation]. Dimensions of diary (closed) 15.25 cm. x 8.5 cm. x 1 cm. (6" x 3.25" x 0.75") This diary is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org).

  6. Declaration For Pension of James W. Watson
    Dimensions: 8.5 in x 17 in. This document is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org)

  7. Discharge Document -- Charles Bollenback
    Dimensions: 8.5 in x 10.75 in. This document is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org).

  8. Discharge Document -- James McElhose
    Dimensions: 7.5 in x 10 in. This document is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org).

  9. Memos of the Traveling Bank - Part 1, Pages 000 - 075 (actual book numbers: cover thru page #26 - blank pages have been omitted).
    A WWII scrapbook of local military personnel This item is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org). The origins of the WWII Traveling Bank as related by Lillian Johnson. I have been asked to give facts and origin of the TRAVELING BANK. A service man came to the door. He asked where he could get breakfast. We let him in and he was made a big breakfast of bacon and eggs. When he left he gave us an ambulance bank. After a lot of thought Mar decided to use the bank for the benefit of the servicemen. The names of local boys who were serving in the armed forces were put into a box and each week one name was drawn from the box. This name was put on the bank and for a week customers put money into the bank. At the end of the week, the monies were counted and a money order sent to the named serviceman and another name was drawn for the following week. On the back wall of the place, (Mar Johnson's Parkview Tavern) was a big map of the United States. Pegs were placed in spots where the boys were stationed. Mr. Mayer, a friend, worked at H. H. Donnelly & Company, a printing concern, and he had a large book made with a khaki colored canvas cover for the Traveling Bank. This name was decided on as the servicemen from Arlington Heights were stationed all over the United States. The first name drawn was Franklin Bublitz. He got $4 and some cents. A money order was made out to him. His reply came back January 24, 1942. This letter was pasted in the book. Later he was missing in action and did not return. The largest amount sent was $100, to Fred Kehe. During the war there was a Prisoner of War camp located on the outskirts of Arlington Heights under the command of Captain Austin Reed. At least twice during that time, the tavern was closed for the day and the United States soldiers who were in charge of that POW camp were treated to home cooked dinners of turkey and ham with all the trimmings. Mar was a kind person who helped when he could. One serviceman came home and asked his parents for help to buy a car. This was denied. He came to us for help. After a lot of thought we helped him and he paid us back in full. Another serviceman came and asked for help, his folks had moved to California. We gave him room and board and helped him until he found a place of his own. Mar and I left Arlington Heights after December, 1950. The TRAVELING BANK book was given to the VFW and is now in the archive collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society.

  10. Memos of the Traveling Bank - Part 2, Pages 076 - 105 (actual book numbers: page #27 thru page #58 - blank pages have been omitted).
    A WWII scrapbook of local military personnel. This item is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org). The origins of the WWII Traveling Bank as related by Lillian Johnson. I have been asked to give facts and origin of the Traveling Bank. A service man came to the door. He asked where he could get breakfast. We let him in and he was made a big breakfast of bacon and eggs. When he left he gave us an ambulance bank. After a lot of thought Mar decided to use the bank for the benefit of the servicemen. The names of local boys who were serving in the armed forces were put into a box and each week one name was drawn from the box. This name was put on the bank and for a week customers put money into the bank. At the end of the week, the monies were counted and a money order sent to the named serviceman and another name was drawn for the following week. On the back wall of the place, (Mar Johnson's Parkview Tavern) was a big map of the United States. Pegs were placed in spots where the boys were stationed. Mr. Mayer, a friend, worked at H. H. Donnelly & Company, a printing concern, and he had a large book made with a khaki colored canvas cover for the Traveling Bank. This name was decided on as the servicemen from Arlington Heights were stationed all over the United States. The first name drawn was Franklin Bublitz. He got $4 and some cents. A money order was made out to him. His reply came back January 24, 1942. This letter was pasted in the book. Later he was missing in action and did not return. The largest amount sent was $100, to Fred Kehe. During the war there was a Prisoner of War camp located on the outskirts of Arlington Heights under the command of Captain Austin Reed. At least twice during that time, the tavern was closed for the day and the United States soldiers who were in charge of that POW camp were treated to home cooked dinners of turkey and ham with all the trimmings. Mar was a kind person who helped when he could. One serviceman came home and asked his parents for help to buy a car. This was denied. He came to us for help. After a lot of thought we helped him and he paid us back in full. Another serviceman came and asked for help, his folks had moved to California. We gave him room and board and helped him until he found a place of his own. Mar and I left Arlington Heights after December, 1950. The TRAVELING BANK book was given to the VFW and is now in the archive collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society.

  11. Memos of the Traveling Bank - Part 3, Pages 106 - 160 (actual book numbers: page #59 thru page #157 - blank pages have been omitted).
    A WWII scrapbook of local military personnel. This item is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org). The origins of the WWII Traveling Bank as related by Lillian Johnson. I have been asked to give facts and origin of the Traveling Bank. A service man came to the door. He asked where he could get breakfast. We let him in and he was made a big breakfast of bacon and eggs. When he left he gave us an ambulance bank. After a lot of thought Mar decided to use the bank for the benefit of the servicemen. The names of local boys who were serving in the armed forces were put into a box and each week one name was drawn from the box. This name was put on the bank and for a week customers put money into the bank. At the end of the week, the monies were counted and a money order sent to the named serviceman and another name was drawn for the following week. On the back wall of the place, (Mar Johnson's Parkview Tavern) was a big map of the United States. Pegs were placed in spots where the boys were stationed. Mr. Mayer, a friend, worked at H. H. Donnelly & Company, a printing concern, and he had a large book made with a khaki colored canvas cover for the Traveling Bank. This name was decided on as the servicemen from Arlington Heights were stationed all over the United States. The first name drawn was Franklin Bublitz. He got $4 and some cents. A money order was made out to him. His reply came back January 24, 1942. This letter was pasted in the book. Later he was missing in action and did not return. The largest amount sent was $100, to Fred Kehe. During the war there was a Prisoner of War camp located on the outskirts of Arlington Heights under the command of Captain Austin Reed. At least twice during that time, the tavern was closed for the day and the United States soldiers who were in charge of that POW camp were treated to home cooked dinners of turkey and ham with all the trimmings. Mar was a kind person who helped when he could. One serviceman came home and asked his parents for help to buy a car. This was denied. He came to us for help. After a lot of thought we helped him and he paid us back in full. Another serviceman came and asked for help, his folks had moved to California. We gave him room and board and helped him until he found a place of his own. Mar and I left Arlington Heights after December, 1950. The TRAVELING BANK book was given to the VFW and is now in the archive collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society.

  12. Memos of the Traveling Bank - Part 4, Pages 161 - 208 (actual book numbers: page #159 thru page #252 - blank pages
    A WWII scrapbook of local military personnel. This item is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org). The origins of the WWII Traveling Bank as related by Lillian Johnson. I have been asked to give facts and origin of the Traveling Bank. A service man came to the door. He asked where he could get breakfast. We let him in and he was made a big breakfast of bacon and eggs. When he left he gave us an ambulance bank. After a lot of thought Mar decided to use the bank for the benefit of the servicemen. The names of local boys who were serving in the armed forces were put into a box and each week one name was drawn from the box. This name was put on the bank and for a week customers put money into the bank. At the end of the week, the monies were counted and a money order sent to the named serviceman and another name was drawn for the following week. On the back wall of the place, (Mar Johnson's Parkview Tavern) was a big map of the United States. Pegs were placed in spots where the boys were stationed. Mr. Mayer, a friend, worked at H. H. Donnelly & Company, a printing concern, and he had a large book made with a khaki colored canvas cover for the Traveling Bank. This name was decided on as the servicemen from Arlington Heights were stationed all over the United States. The first name drawn was Franklin Bublitz. He got $4 and some cents. A money order was made out to him. His reply came back January 24, 1942. This letter was pasted in the book. Later he was missing in action and did not return. The largest amount sent was $100, to Fred Kehe. During the war there was a Prisoner of War camp located on the outskirts of Arlington Heights under the command of Captain Austin Reed. At least twice during that time, the tavern was closed for the day and the United States soldiers who were in charge of that POW camp were treated to home cooked dinners of turkey and ham with all the trimmings. Mar was a kind person who helped when he could. One serviceman came home and asked his parents for help to buy a car. This was denied. He came to us for help. After a lot of thought we helped him and he paid us back in full. Another serviceman came and asked for help, his folks had moved to California. We gave him room and board and helped him until he found a place of his own. Mar and I left Arlington Heights after December, 1950. The TRAVELING BANK book was given to the VFW and is now in the archive collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society.

  13. Memos of the Traveling Bank - Part 5, Pages 209 - 266 (actual book numbers: page #253 thru page #423 - blank pages have been omitted).
    A WWII scrapbook of local military personnel. This item is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org). The origins of the WWII Traveling Bank as related by Lillian Johnson. I have been asked to give facts and origin of the TRAVELING BANK. A service man came to the door. He asked where he could get breakfast. We let him in and he was made a big breakfast of bacon and eggs. When he left he gave us an ambulance bank. After a lot of thought Mar decided to use the bank for the benefit of the servicemen. The names of local boys who were serving in the armed forces were put into a box and each week one name was drawn from the box. This name was put on the bank and for a week customers put money into the bank. At the end of the week, the monies were counted and a money order sent to the named serviceman and another name was drawn for the following week. On the back wall of the place, (Mar Johnson's Parkview Tavern) was a big map of the United States. Pegs were placed in spots where the boys were stationed. Mr. Mayer, a friend, worked at H. H. Donnelly & Company, a printing concern, and he had a large book made with a khaki colored canvas cover for the Traveling Bank. This name was decided on as the servicemen from Arlington Heights were stationed all over the United States. The first name drawn was Franklin Bublitz. He got $4 and some cents. A money order was made out to him. His reply came back January 24, 1942. This letter was pasted in the book. Later he was missing in action and did not return. The largest amount sent was $100, to Fred Kehe. During the war there was a Prisoner of War camp located on the outskirts of Arlington Heights under the command of Captain Austin Reed. At least twice during that time, the tavern was closed for the day and the United States soldiers who were in charge of that POW camp were treated to home cooked dinners of turkey and ham with all the trimmings. Mar was a kind person who helped when he could. One serviceman came home and asked his parents for help to buy a car. This was denied. He came to us for help. After a lot of thought we helped him and he paid us back in full. Another serviceman came and asked for help, his folks had moved to California. We gave him room and board and helped him until he found a place of his own. Mar and I left Arlington Heights after December, 1950. The TRAVELING BANK book was given to the VFW and is now in the archive collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society.

  14. Roll of Company C, 19th Illinois Volunteer Infantry
    List of officers and enlisted men, with place of residence, dates of enlistment, and discharge, death, transfer, or desertion remarks. This document is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org).

  15. With Sherman from Chattanooga to Atlanta
    A letter written to his brother, Mathias, summarizing Charles Sigwalt's exploits during a part of General Sherman's campaign. Charles Sigwalt, originally a resident of Long Grove, Illinois, went on to become a prominent businessman, Postmaster and eventually Village President [Mayor] of Arlington Heights, Illinois. He was Village President during the years 1891-1893, 1894-1897 and 1899-1905. Charles' letter was typed up and bound by Mathias' son, Eugene, and presented to Charles 34 years later in a 36 page book. This bound letter is part of the collection of the Arlington Heights Historical Society (http://www.ahmuseum.org).

  Records 1 to 15 of 15